Europeans rejoice, American internationalism is back! What to expect from Biden’s foreign policy and how will it affect the EU

American foreign policy is a constant swing between isolationism and internationalism. The former is a policy that consists of turning inwards and departing from world affairs, while internationalism promotes greater political and economic cooperation between states. As a short account of American foreign policy history, the period between the American Revolution and World War I …

Assessing the democratic advantage. A book review of The Return of Great Power Rivalry by Matthew Kroenig

In 1987, Paul Kennedy publishes The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers. This provoking work paved the way for a new current of American foreign policy thinking: American diclinism. According to this school, Washington can no longer dominate the international plane and will inevitably decline to the profit of other powers, whether it might be …

Why Russia is not a threat to the European Union

In 2016 two events greatly shaped and, to some extent, destabilised the world we live in: the American Presidential election in November and the Brexit referendum in the United Kingdom in June. Both events have faced credibility challenges, with observers arguing that both political campaigns have been mined by lies and deception tactics[1]. Political thinkers …

To deal or not to deal. A study of the efficacy of sanctions with regards to Iran.

Economic sanctions can more often than not be considered a peaceful way of making war. Indeed, this tool of foreign policy seems to be the preferred mode of action when war is not an option. The first economic sanctions can be traced back as far as 432 B.C. – it was issued by the Athenians …

A theoretical perspective: US-China relations in a growing and democratising world. What should we expect?

With the relative decline of the U.S. hegemony and the absolute rise of China on the world stage, the global liberal economic order is actively being redefined, and the balance of power seems to drift from the West to the East slowly. In this article, I use theoretical perspectives to sketch what the up and coming order could look like should China continue to grow and democratise. I will show that Liberal theorists, based on the democratic peace theory, expect the U.S.-Chinese relations to engage in mutual gain trade. In contrast, Realist theorists consider the principle of anarchy to be too strong and the security dilemma to be too powerful for the relations to remain peaceful.

The Trump/Kim 2019 Hanoi Summit and a critic of modern US diplomacy

The United-States President Donald Trump met DPRK (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) President Kim Jong Un for a second two-day Summit in Hanoi, Vietnam, 27-28 February 2019. The Hanoi Summit is a follow up to the Singapore Summit, 12 June 2018, which was a historic moment in the US/DPRK tensed diplomatic history. The Singapore Summit …